Minnesota Farmer


Back to South Africa

On Wednesday, August 2, 2017, ten members of churches in the Shetek Conference of the ELCA left for the Ondini Circuit in the Kwa-Zulu Natal of South Africa.  This group from Southwestern Minnesota included 5 farmers, a nurse, a food service worker, a pastor and two young men just headed off to college.  For 4 of us this was a return trip, for the rest it was a new adventure.

Roughly, the Ondini Circuit includes the area from Estcourt, Muden and Weenen in the southeast to Bethlehem and Reitz in the northwest.  It goes from the foothills of the Drakensberg mountains and up into the mountains.  The area is rough.  Valleys and level areas are separated by sharp hills in the southeast and buttes and mesas in the northwest.  The best farmland is controlled by descendents of white settlers, but many areas with good potential still exist in the native, black settled areas.

Most homes in this area have access to clean water, but in some cases it may be a barrel that is filled by a water truck.  Homes vary from those with every convenience we here in the U.S. expect to a steel or concrete walled structure with a steel roof.  If you have a job, you have a decent home, if you do not, the living is rough.

Temperatures in the area rarely fall below freezing so homes are easy to heat with a small fire or heater in the winter.  Summer temperatures are hot, but not unbearably so, the nighttime cooling easily counters the daytime heat.

This is dry country.  What rain they get makes it easy to grow crops in the spring and summer, but this land can support year around agriculture, irrigation is needed to get a really dependable crop, and the area has had a three-year run of drought.  Runoff from the Drakensberg mountains fills reservoirs, but not all water is impounded like it could be.  Some of the water is destined for drier cities to the north and is not accessible for local use.

Our trip was mainly to visit the black churches of the Ondini circuit, to talk about health and wellness issues, pastoral support and ways to provide other support to the many who live here on government support.  It is an important task that local churches have taken on, but they need help. Most expertise to run mission outposts was removed when the post Apartheid government and churches took power.  It is to one of these old mission outposts that we were bound.

More posts are coming on our trip to the Ondini.  Stay tuned.

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