Minnesota Farmer


Of Camping, Host Homes and Hotel Rooms
August 26, 2017, 10:08 am
Filed under: church, house, Kwazamohkuhle, Ondini circuit, Shetek Conference, South Africa, travel

Travel in a foreign land can give you an opportunity to see how other cultures live and play.  Our stays at the Kwazamokuhle Diaconal Centre were a bit rough by our standards, but sufficient.

The guest house we stayed in is more like an older bible camp building than a house.  There is a small “suite” on one end that has its own kitchen, bath, living area and bedroom.  The middle of the building has a kitchen, bath and living area with three bedrooms down the hall.  In front is an open porch with an entry to a toilet and shower area on one side and the “bunk house” (bunk beds for 7) and a bath tub room.  There is another bunk house room around back.

All of the rooms were small.  Each sleeping area included a wardrobe and beds but not much else.  The water heater was slow and water pressure could run out if you were there at the wrong time.

Electricity on the grounds was of the older “Type M” plug, not part of the standard power converters. We had two power converters in our group, and it looked like we would not be able to use them, but Andy had found a 3-for sale on type M plugs and saved the day.  Newer outlets could have a different configuration.

Others on the grounds lived in small houses, or even storage rooms.  Rambo invited me into his bachelor’s quarters in one of those store rooms.  By the time he put in a bed, wardrobe and table the room was full.  He was just happy to have a place to call his own.

When we went exploring in the Champagne valley (upper left on this tourist brochure) we got a look at how tourists live and play in the area. The road goes into the Drakensberg mountains.  The paved road is narrow, and becomes more so as you reach its end.  Along the way you pass restaurants, shopping areas, B&B’s, the Champagne Valley resort, The Drakensberg Boys School, and high up at the end of the winding road is the Monk’s Cowl Wildlife area.  There is a lot of luxury along the way only a few kilometers from concrete huts.

The end of the road has hiking and some tourist shops.

There are campsites available in some really fantastic scenery.  The campsites were more suitable for tents, but a smaller caravan (camper) could make it up to road and stay here.  We also saw campsites at Weenen game park, again primitive, but great scenery.

If you clicked the link for the Champagne Valley Resort, you know they have some really nice hotel rooms.  There are also self-service type lodges in the area of many different types.

I have been honored to visit several homes in my visits to South Africa.  They have been homes of ministers, teachers and government agency employees.  All have been compact and well-kept.  Since most housing in the area is of block, brick or cement, they can have issues we are not used to.  Any wet can cause paint to peel off of cement, so bathrooms quite often had peeling paint.  I saw some really wonderful kitchens in these small homes, especially if they’re in the city.

Every home has a fence.  In rural areas it is just a wire fence to keep out roaming livestock.  Fences in the city got more ornate as you climbed the income ladder.  To have a garage or carport was really upscale.  A larger home would have a remote-controlled gate, or even a gate guard if the grounds were larger.

Kitchens in the country were a bit rougher.  This is the stove area in the Centre’s dining hall.  They had a central prep area and a cleanup area on the opposite wall.  Cooktops were bottled gas.  They did have a small oven, but most cooking was done on a gas stove top.

Living areas in homes tended to overstuffed couches and large screen TV’s.  There were also some massive sound systems in these small homes.  Dining areas would fit the table, chairs and not much else.  Decoration tended toward large posters and calendars of school, church or family events.  Running water was available in all of the homes I visited, but not always a water heater.

I never got into any of the smaller homes in the area.  It is easy to imagine by their size that they do not have much.  When you live in a concrete or steel house that is only about 12 feet square there is not room for much.  If you have no running water or electricity, cook your food over a wood fire and use an outside toilet, I suspect the living is rough.

There is a large difference in how people live in the Ondini Circuit.  Those with some get-up-and-go have either left or live as public servants and make a living the best they can.  Those without money live on government payments and often live very rough.

In town, the unemployed may have staked out an area of street or a parking lot where they give parking directions for tips.  Since parking areas are small, or nonexistent this help is welcome.  Pan handlers are scarce, but around.  Many a job we would use a machine to do, they have laborers to keep busy.

South Africa is trying very hard to make its way into the first world, but with so many to employ and such a difference between haves and have-nots, they have a long road ahead of them.  That the government is run by one party, the African National Congress controls 80% of the votes, does not help them get much better.  When things get tough, the people will rise up and get free water, electricity or more government money.  It is a government run by protesters, and our South African hosts are trying to change it.  I wish them luck, it will not be easy.

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